Research impact survey

Dr. Karen Shalev Greene, Director of the Centre for the Study of Missing Persons would like to invite you to take part in their research study. Before you decide, Karen would like you to understand why the research is being done and what it would involve for you. Talk to others about the study if you wish. Ask Karen if there is anything that is not clear (karen.shalev-greene@port.ac.uk).

One of the key components of academic work is to be able to demonstrate that research has had impact, which means having an effect on, change or benefit to public policy or services. The Centre for the Study of Missing Persons are assessed on the quality of outputs (e.g. publications, performances, and exhibitions), their impact beyond academia, and the environment that supports research. 

If you are a part of the community of practitioners working in areas relating to missing persons, Karen would love to hear from you. This is in order to learn whether their research benefitted you personally and/or led  to change in policy or practice within your organisation. The survey includes questions about various publications they released as well as their overall work in this field. There is also has a short demographic section. The survey should only take around 5-10 minutes to complete.

It is up to you to decide to join the study. Responses are anonymous and there will be no effort made to identify you. Data will be stored securely in a password protected file and kept for 10 years before being destroyed. You may skip answers you do not wish to answer and you may withdraw at any time before finishing the survey. However, you will not be able to withdraw from the study after you complete the survey as we have no way of identifying you.

Thank you for taking the time to read this information sheet.  If you’re interested in taking part please follow the link below. The survey will be open between 17th July 2019 to 31st July 2019.

 

https://portsmouth.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/centre-for-the-study-of-missing-persons-research-impact